reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 234

via


cavetocanvas:

Frans Snyders and Peter Paul Rubens, Philopomenes Recognized, 1609-10

From the Museo del Prado:

According to Plutarch, Philopomenes, a strategist and general of the Aequian League that fought against Sparta, visited the city of Megara. Because of his unassuming, humble appearance, the lady of the house confused him with a servant and put him to work. The present scene depicts the moment when the husband realizes the general’s true identity, under whose modest appearance is hidden the grandeur of his personality.

Painted right after Rubens returned from Italy, this work reveals the artist’s profound knowledge of classical culture. Its formal aspects, forceful figures and almost tenebrist treatment of light also bear witness to his southern influence.

The idea carried out by these two artists together in the same work marked the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Rubens and Snyders. Such collaborations were actually quite frequent among Flemish artists. Rubens made the figures while the large still life in the foreground is by Snyders, who shows the same taste for detain in his depiction of some of the animals he would repeat throughout his career, such as turkeys and swans.


  # frans snyders    # rubens    # art    # art history  

reblogged 2 years ago / reblog
Apr

♥ 5

via

mesbeauxarts:

Sir Peter Paul Rubens, after Titian. Worship of Venus. 1592-1640.
Oil on canvas.
Nationalmuseum. Stockholm, Sweden.

mesbeauxarts:

Sir Peter Paul Rubens, after Titian. Worship of Venus. 1592-1640.

Oil on canvas.

Nationalmuseum. Stockholm, Sweden.


  # sir peter paul rubens    # Peter Paul Rubens    # rubens    # titian    # worship of venus    # worship    # venus    # Aphrodite    # mythology    # myth    # nationalmuseum    # flemish    # flanders    # art  

reblogged 2 years ago / reblog
Apr

♥ 38

via

mesbeauxarts:

Sir Peter Paul Rubens. The Abduction of Ganymede. 1611-1612.
Oil on canvas.
Schwarzenberg Palace. Vienna, Austria.

mesbeauxarts:

Sir Peter Paul Rubens. The Abduction of Ganymede. 1611-1612.

Oil on canvas.

Schwarzenberg Palace. Vienna, Austria.


  # sir peter paul rubens    # peter paul rubens    # rubens    # the abduction of ganymede    # ganymede    # abduction    # kidnapping    # eagle    # ganymede and the eagle    # mythology    # myth    # classical    # baroque    # flanders    # flemish  

reblogged 2 years ago / reblog
Mar

♥ 7

via

mesbeauxarts:

Sir Peter Paul Rubens and workshop, including Sir Anthony van Dyck. Achilles discovered by Odysseus. ca. 1617.
Oil on canvas.
Museo del Prado. Madrid, España.

mesbeauxarts:

Sir Peter Paul Rubens and workshop, including Sir Anthony van Dyck. Achilles discovered by Odysseus. ca. 1617.

Oil on canvas.

Museo del Prado. Madrid, España.


  # sir peter paul rubens    # peter paul rubens    # rubens    # sir anthony van dyck    # anthony van dyck    # van dyck    # dyck    # achilles discovered by odysseus    # achilles    # odysseus    # iliad    # homer    # troy    # trojan    # mythology    # myth    # classical    # baroque    # flanders    # flemish  

reblogged 2 years ago / reblog
Feb

♥ 152

via

cavetocanvas:

Peter Paul Rubens, Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus, 1617
Upon his return to Antwerp after a decade in Italy, Rubens began to paint mythological subjects such as this one for various patrons. In this scene, Castor and Pollux swoop down to kidnap two women; abduction scenes were popular during this time. There’s an undulating, circular motion to the painting; it spirals around the circular point of the central woman, and with the figures placed in the foreground, it’s impossible to look away. Rubens diffuses any act of violence with the details; the woman in the center is resting her hand lightly on her abductor’s arm, and the kneeling woman’s foot is placed delicately on top of one of the brother’s foot near the bottom of the painting. Rubens uses color to guide the viewer’s eyes through the composition; the red cloth weaves in and out of the figures, a common motif that Rubens uses in various paintings. The women are both fleshy, large, and heroic; typical Rubanesque figures. The setting and landscape in the background was probably completed by workshop assistants; Rubens ran a tight and highly methodical workshop in order to accomodate the numerous commissions he received upon his return from Italy.

cavetocanvas:

Peter Paul Rubens, Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus, 1617

Upon his return to Antwerp after a decade in Italy, Rubens began to paint mythological subjects such as this one for various patrons. In this scene, Castor and Pollux swoop down to kidnap two women; abduction scenes were popular during this time. There’s an undulating, circular motion to the painting; it spirals around the circular point of the central woman, and with the figures placed in the foreground, it’s impossible to look away. Rubens diffuses any act of violence with the details; the woman in the center is resting her hand lightly on her abductor’s arm, and the kneeling woman’s foot is placed delicately on top of one of the brother’s foot near the bottom of the painting. Rubens uses color to guide the viewer’s eyes through the composition; the red cloth weaves in and out of the figures, a common motif that Rubens uses in various paintings. The women are both fleshy, large, and heroic; typical Rubanesque figures. The setting and landscape in the background was probably completed by workshop assistants; Rubens ran a tight and highly methodical workshop in order to accomodate the numerous commissions he received upon his return from Italy.


  # art    # art history    # rubens    # rape of the daughters of leucippus