reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 130

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stfueverything:

tloaofficial:

stfueverything:

mister-boss:

~*°*Sexism against men is still sexism*°*~

You don’t know what sexism is.

Sexism is prejudice or discrimination based on a person’s sex.”

No, apparently you do not know what sexism is.

PREJUDICE PLUS POWER. Sexism is an institutionalized/systematic oppression based on someone’s sex. Men have never been oppressed for being men.


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 3145

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reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 136

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cavetocanvas:

Georges Rouault, At the Café, c. 1906

cavetocanvas:

Georges Rouault, At the Café, c. 1906


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 118

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foodopia:

sweet corn muffins: recipe here

foodopia:

sweet corn muffins: recipe here


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 59

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In 40 years time, they’ll catch some bad guy doing something. Then for the next couple of weeks the media will be revealing his whole life in reverse, right back to a HD video of his birth, pictures of his mum pregnant, another video smiling at the camera showing a positive pregnancy test. Finally they’d play the phone recording of the father asking the mother out on a 1st date and everyone will wonder how they both could make such a bad decision and should they be charged.


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 540

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BREAKING: In an 8-1 decision, the Supreme Court strikes down rules that require prayer or reading of Bible in public schools.

~

@TodayIn1963, the newest project from NPR’s Code Switch.

All summer long, Code Switch will be following events from the landmark summer of 1963. 50 years ago was a pivotal moment in history, where the sparks of the Civil Rights movement caught flame, and the fire forged a new era in American history.

Today in 1963, The Supreme Court upheld the separation of Church and State in Abington School District v. Schempp. As the U.S. waits for more Civil Rights decisions from the SCOTUS before its summer recess, we’re reminded of where we came from…starting the summer of 1963.

(via npr)  

reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 94

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todaysdocument:

Spotty Lincoln

Congressman Abraham Lincoln drafted this resolution asking President Polk to prove that the spot where American and Mexican troops clashed was really in the United States. Polk used the incident to lead the nation into war, which Lincoln opposed.

Resolution introduced by Congressman Abraham Lincoln to “establish whether the particular spot of soil which the blood of our citizens was so shed was, or was not, our own soil.” Often referred to as Lincoln’s Spot Resolution., 12/22/1847


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 29

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booksnbuildings:

Bibliothèque Municipale, Versailles.
Architect Jean-Baptiste Berthier, 1761
Photography: Helga Schmidt-Glassner

booksnbuildings:

Bibliothèque Municipale, Versailles.

Architect Jean-Baptiste Berthier, 1761

Photography: Helga Schmidt-Glassner


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 3062

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I’m going to be real honest with you—the Republican Party doesn’t want black people to vote.

~

Tea Party leader Ken Emanuelson,

(via theamericanprospect)

Instead of being lying racists, the Republicans will now be truthful racists.

(via recall-all-republicans)

 

reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 987

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kenobi-wan-obi:

nbcnews:

Meet Alex, first ‘Sesame’ Muppet to have a dad in jail
(Photo: TODAY)
Those friendly, fuzzy Muppets from “Sesame Street” have helped kids open up about all sorts of serious subjects, from hunger and divorce to military deployment.
But they’re now tackling a much more unexpected issue: incarceration.
Continue reading

Just to let you know how bad the incarceration rate has gotten, it’s now a sesame street issue.

kenobi-wan-obi:

nbcnews:

Meet Alex, first ‘Sesame’ Muppet to have a dad in jail

(Photo: TODAY)

Those friendly, fuzzy Muppets from “Sesame Street” have helped kids open up about all sorts of serious subjects, from hunger and divorce to military deployment.

But they’re now tackling a much more unexpected issue: incarceration.

Continue reading

Just to let you know how bad the incarceration rate has gotten, it’s now a sesame street issue.


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 2090

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stalkingstalkerthatstalks:

Friendly reminder that heterophobia/misandry/reverse racism will never have the same power as its counterparts.

And if you are ignorant enough to believe it does then you completely erase and ignore the centuries of suffering, genocide, and prejudice oppressed groups had and are still dealing with. 

Because hurt feelings (genuine or not) =/= institutionalized oppression


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 143

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writersnoonereads:

At Weird Fiction Review, Edward Gauvin discusses a writer no one reads and translates the first lines from 65 of his stories:

Pierre Bettencourt (1917 – 2006) is a merry prankster, an eccentric of French letters. If the history of the French fantastique in the 20th century has gone somewhat underground, if many of its practitioners are forgotten today, Bettencourt is even more obscure, a lifelong outsider artist despite coming from a prominent family: his younger brother André Bettencourt was the head of L’Oréal and held a senate seat for 44 years (that’s three presidents), while André’s wife Liliane was involved in one of the biggest tax evasion and campaign financing scandals in recent French history. Bettencourt was also a painter, known for his layered pieces featuring such mixed media as butterfly wings, stone, eggshells, and pine needles. [cont. reading]

Sample lines translated by Gauvin:

11. My wife and I have a way of sleeping together that might seem a bit bizarre: neither face to face nor back to back, but with the soles of our feet pressed together.
14. I just lost my head. Little by little, my neck stretched out like an hourglass, and then tied off all by itself, without any gush of blood.
22. No one has the right to cut their nails here: except priests.
29. I have pills for dreaming.
34. The spiders around here mean no harm. You fall asleep in a lawn chair and wake up trussed hand and foot.
58. A very elegant thing to do in these parts is dressing half in flesh, half in bones.
 [cont. reading]

Image by Pierre Bettencourt

writersnoonereads:

At Weird Fiction ReviewEdward Gauvin discusses a writer no one reads and translates the first lines from 65 of his stories:

Pierre Bettencourt (1917 – 2006) is a merry prankster, an eccentric of French letters. If the history of the French fantastique in the 20th century has gone somewhat underground, if many of its practitioners are forgotten today, Bettencourt is even more obscure, a lifelong outsider artist despite coming from a prominent family: his younger brother André Bettencourt was the head of L’Oréal and held a senate seat for 44 years (that’s three presidents), while André’s wife Liliane was involved in one of the biggest tax evasion and campaign financing scandals in recent French history. Bettencourt was also a painter, known for his layered pieces featuring such mixed media as butterfly wings, stone, eggshells, and pine needles. [cont. reading]

Sample lines translated by Gauvin:

11. My wife and I have a way of sleeping together that might seem a bit bizarre: neither face to face nor back to back, but with the soles of our feet pressed together.

14. I just lost my head. Little by little, my neck stretched out like an hourglass, and then tied off all by itself, without any gush of blood.

22. No one has the right to cut their nails here: except priests.

29. I have pills for dreaming.

34. The spiders around here mean no harm. You fall asleep in a lawn chair and wake up trussed hand and foot.

58. A very elegant thing to do in these parts is dressing half in flesh, half in bones.

 [cont. reading]

Image by Pierre Bettencourt


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 755

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discardingimages:

snailfight ‘The Smithfield Decretals’ (Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria), Tolouse ca. 1300, illuminations added in London ca. 1340.
British Library, Royal 10 E IV, fol. 107r

discardingimages:

snailfight 

‘The Smithfield Decretals’ (Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria), Tolouse ca. 1300, illuminations added in London ca. 1340.

British Library, Royal 10 E IV, fol. 107r


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 436

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surfthrough-waves:

India. Golden Temple, Amritsar, Punjab. Photo by A&M on Flickr. 

surfthrough-waves:

India. Golden Temple, Amritsar, Punjab. Photo by A&M on Flickr. 


reblogged 1 year ago / reblog
Jun

♥ 519

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collectivehistory:

London’s Piccadilly Circus, 1949 (via Imgur)

collectivehistory:

London’s Piccadilly Circus, 1949 (via Imgur)